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Roughing out geometry in 3D model

Discussion in 'Using Alibre Design' started by dave1952, May 18, 2020.

  1. dave1952

    dave1952 Member

    All my machining is manual. I want to lay out what I call a roughing out geometry in my 3D model. In other words, I want to set up the tool path I will use to remove the bulk of material and then use my completed model to determine my tool path for finish. For clarity, "tool path" is the position I will set my tool at (dimension minus the tool radius) to achieve the desired design. I can put this "roughing out" on the bottom of my finish geometry, say .005" deep, and then suppress it so it doesn't interfere with the finished model. I can't put it within the model itself because I want to see both roughing and finish at the same time. Does anybody have a better way of doing this? Don't ask for an upload just yet, I'm working on it right now.
     
  2. Lew_Merrick

    Lew_Merrick Alibre Super User

    Hi Dave -- I began my apprenticeship as a Tool & Die machinist in 1967. Typically I create a "Rough Cut Stock" component for my Model that truley represents the piece of material delivered to the "first op" at the machine. I then "dress it" (6 "faces" typically) to the "dressed size" I expect to start "production" from. I Rename each Feature (starting with "dressing to size") as it continues to the "Finished Part." Should you wish more "oversight" on this approach, e-mail me (tangent@olympus.net) with a date & time (I am Pacific Daylight Time aka GNT-7) and we can do a GoToMeeting. -- Lew
     
  3. NateLiqGrav

    NateLiqGrav Alibre Super User

    You could create them as separate parts constrained to the origin in an assembly.
    Or one part with two different configurations.
     
  4. dave1952

    dave1952 Member

    Lew:
    Thanks for responding. I'm not sure I'm following. First you create your "Rough Cut Stock" model then modify it to "Finished Part". Is this all one model or do you use "Rough Cut Stock" first and generate drawings from it and then go back and modify to "Finished Part and generate new drawings?

    Dave
     
  5. dave1952

    dave1952 Member

    Nate:
    Thanks for responding. I assume you saw Lew's reply which I've asked questions for clarification. I'm trying to visualize how an assembly would work for something like I'm suggesting. Could you give a little more information on how to do it?

    Dave
     
  6. dave1952

    dave1952 Member

    A little more information for those responding. I create 3D models for the sole purpose of generating 2D drawings. It's the drawings I work off to machine my parts. Yes, I know: archaic in this day and age.
    Dave
     
  7. albie0803

    albie0803 Alibre Super User

    we have both manual and cnc machines so we use both models and drawings. Drawings can have notes which models do not.
     
  8. Lew_Merrick

    Lew_Merrick Alibre Super User

    Hi Dave -- Archaic??? I still use Trav-A-Dials on my mill and lathe. However, in designing a Part that is going to be machined, I like the Modeling Process to set the path for the Machining Process. Yes, weird and strange is my normal. -- Lew
     
  9. NateLiqGrav

    NateLiqGrav Alibre Super User

    Overlay them in an assembly to see them at the same time. Set the rough size part to have a different Color and Opacity. Here is a quick example using an Assembly and Configurations for each step (stock block, rough cut, and final pass). You could do much better than what I did quickly in this file but you should get the idea.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. JST

    JST Alibre Super User

    The 2D drawings are by no means archaic.... There must be a definition of the part that is human-readable.

    That is needed for documentation of what the part or product is, and how it is to be made, materials, processes, etc..

    That is needed so QC has something to work from

    If the part or product must be certified, or carry an engineer's stamp, then a drawing is needed to document that as well as basic product design. If there is ever a court dispute, see how far you get if you only have a part model......
     
  11. dave1952

    dave1952 Member

    Nate:
    Thanks again for replying. OK, now I understand what you're talking about. It helps to see an example. I'm going to try this approach because it just might work for what I want. Your help is appreciated.

    Dave
     
  12. dave1952

    dave1952 Member

    You want to talk archaic: when I first started machining in 1980 we used lard, yes COOKING LARD for our cutting fluid. The problem was, as the tool and workpiece heated up, the lard would burn off, with an appetizing flavor.

    Dave
     
  13. Lew_Merrick

    Lew_Merrick Alibre Super User

    Hi Dave -- The first "task" I was given after having spent a month cleaning up chips and sweeping as an apreentice was to make a "1.000 inch cube" out of a piece of 1.250 inch thick HRS plate with a hacksaw, a knife-edge square, a micrometer, and a file. Not .999 inch, not 1.001 inch. All three directions and no light shining through the square! That was 1966. -- Lew
     
  14. bigseb

    bigseb Alibre Super User

    Lol. That was the first exercise in my apprenticeship too.
     
  15. Lew_Merrick

    Lew_Merrick Alibre Super User

    Hi Sebastian -- Ah, but did you make the male and female (.750 inch, in my case) Hex's? [A .0005 inch cigarette paper had to "tear" in each 3 rotations.] -- Lew
     
  16. bigseb

    bigseb Alibre Super User

    That was the next exercise.
     
  17. Lew_Merrick

    Lew_Merrick Alibre Super User

    Ah, egg-beater drill, fret saw, file, scrapers, and a die-protractor? [Irrational minds want to know...] -- Lew
     
  18. bigseb

    bigseb Alibre Super User

    Egg beater drill? lol no, we had electricity by then. Small bench drill, hacksaw and various grades of files (last one using chalk).
     
  19. Lew_Merrick

    Lew_Merrick Alibre Super User

    Herr-Meister Muller did not allow me to "use electricity" until after I made the first four "required projects."
     
  20. bigseb

    bigseb Alibre Super User

    Not us. We Germans are far too efficient to drill things by hand. ;)

    My father and I did our apprenticeship at the same company, Hella, in Paderborn, but almost 30 years apart. We had the same Meister in our first year. Herr Krawinkel. Dude was pushing it when I arrived but he was all right.
     
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